Musings

WD My Passport Pro SSD – SMBv2 / Win 10

To enable SMBv2 compatibility on the Western Digital My Passport Pro SSD, so that it supports Windows 10, go through the following steps.

1) Enable SSH access via the admin console
2) Use PuTTy/etc to log into the console
3) nano /etc/samba/smb.conf
4) add the line
[global] workgroup = WORKGROUP
server string = MyPassport Wireless Pro
netbios name = MyPassport
protocol = SMB2

5) run /etc/init.d/S75smb restart
6) try and browse to the \\ IP of the disk drive
7) If you can’t login (username admin) reset the password by typing
8) /etc/samba/smbpasswd -a admin
Enter the new password
9) Finally restart Samba again (per 5)
10) Profit?

Skype for Business – Audio Conferencing Behaviour

If you have Skype for Business telephony services, including audio conferencing hosted by Microsoft (365), it is worth sharing the current workflow experience, which doesn’t seem to be well documented.

 

From a host, or moderator perspective, you dial into the meeting using your assigned phone number, shown on your Skype for Business invite.

  1. The Skype Meeting Attendant answers the phone, and asks you to enter the conference id, following by the # key.
  2. You enter the meeting number (again, shown on the invite).
  3. You’re prompted to press * if you are the leader – you’d press *
  4. You enter the pin assigned to your account
  5. You’re dropped into the meeting, and your name or number is announced if enabled.

From an end user perspective, the process is pretty much the same, except that if the leader has already joined, they’re not prompted to enter the pin number.

Unlike other ACPs, the control of the service appears to be pretty non-existent, and I think this is by design.  After all, control of the meeting can be done from the mobile app if you’re not near a desktop.
You’re not able to start a meeting recording, as this service is performed by the Skype client, recording into your local computer folder, so if this is required then that is your only option.

I think MS Teams may take a different approach, but I’ve not got my hands on telephony/audio in that product yet.

Replicating Linux Machines across a Network

This command will replicate a running machine into a remote machine container.
The source machine can be online and running, the remote machine should be booted via a Linux Live Image.   The destination machine should also have the same or larger disk size than the source machine.

Sending Machine
dd if=/dev/sda bs=16M conv=sync,noerror status=progress | gzip –9 -cf | nc destinationmachineip preferredport -q 10

Receiving Machine
nc –l –p preferredport | gzip –dfc | dd bs=16M of=/dev/sda

It is worth doing some test copies if you have a large image to send, or are on a slow network, altering the block size (bs=) and gzip compression amount (-9).  Particularly on the latter, on a fast network, you may be better off using lower compression, as the CPU cycles required for compression may in fact take longer than sending the data uncompressed or at a lower compression rate.

You can also use other compression programs like pigz to achieve better performance.

Booting Windows 2016 on HP G8 Microserver MicroSD Card

As good as FreeNAS has been, most of the clients on my home network are Windows based and speak CIFS/SMB,  and I’ve not had great success with FreeNAS reliably/stably serving these protocols.   Under load, the shares sometimes lock up and stop responding, and permissions can be a bit hit and miss.

FreeNAS support forums drink their own special brand of cool aid, so I’ve decided to try Windows, which, whilst being part of their own borg collective has a much wider base of users and obviously native integration with my client base.  So I’m piloting Windows Server 2016 with its various storage capabilities to see how it compares.
I’ve got a HP Microserver G8 which as well as 4 disk trays, supports a fifth SATA device via an additional ODD port, an internal USB and a MicroSD port, as well as various external USBs.
My FreeNAS is a previous N54L Microserver, which installs and boots easily to a USB drive, but Windows is a bit more pig-headed at booting from USB/MicroSD devices.
However, with the help of Daniels Tech Blog https://www.danielstechblog.info/how-to-deploy-windows-server-2016-tp3-onto-an-sd-card/  I have managed to get my Microserver booting from the MicroSD Card
Daniels instructions are more or less spot on, except for one change.
diskpart
list disk
select disk x
clean
create partition primary
format quick fs=ntfs label="SD"
active
assign letter=C
exit
dism /Apply-Image /ImageFile:D:sourcesinstall.wim /index:2 /ApplyDir:C:
bootsect /nt60 C: /force /mbr
bcdboot C:Windows

I couldn’t get that final line to write to the MicroSD. I kept getting errors about BCDBOOT not being able to write the files, or unable to find the source location. However, I read the documentation about BCDBOOT at Microsofts MSDN site https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/windows/hardware/commercialize/manufacture/desktop/bcdboot-command-line-options-techref-di and happened upon the command for writing to USB devices.

bcdboot C:Windows /s C: /f ALL

This seems to work fine, and a reboot allows Windows 2016 to boot.